Innovative  

Following internationally recognized best practice, the Early Intervention Program (EIP) at CDC aims to improve the quality of life of children with mild to moderate autism and related developmental delays from 1.5 years to 6 years of age. Under the umbrella approach of ABA, the EIP incorporates a variety of interventions from across the multi-disciplinary teams including Speech and Language and Occupational Therapy, ensuring the student has a comprehensive and balanced therapy program that meets their individual needs.

 

With a high ratio of therapists to students, our program provides 20 hours of therapy per week. Throughout their 4 hour day, children receive a minimum of 2 hours 1:1 therapy between ABA, OT and SLP in the key skill areas noted above, and 2 hours of group therapy where they practice important social skills such as interacting with peers, following typical classroom routines and developmentally appropriate play skills.

 

We play with purpose in the Early Intervention! 


Our Early Intervention Program learners started on Sept. 6, 2015 in a newly renovated classroom! The unique cubicle setup allows one-on-one Applied Behavior Analysis (ABA) sessions to take place within the class for all students simultaneously. Our appreciation to our corporate partners, Tasweeq, who donated for our classroom renovations. 


Recommended Resources:

  • National Autism Center. (2015). Findings and conclusions: National standards project, phase 2. Randolph, MA: Author.
  • Reichow, B. (2012). Overview of meta-analyses on early intensive behavioral intervention for young children with autism spectrum disorders. Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders, 42, 512-520.
  • United States Surgeon General (1998). Mental health: A report of the Surgeon General. Washington, DC: Author.
  • Wong, C., Odom, S. L., Hume, K. Cox, A. W., Fettig, A., Kucharczyk, S., … Schultz, T. R. (2014). Evidence-based practices for children, youth, and young adults with Autism Spectrum Disorder. Chapel Hill: The University of North Carolina, Frank Porter Graham Child Development Institute, Autism Evidence-Based Practice Review Group.
  • Wong, C., Odom, S. L., Hume, K. A., Cox, C. W., Fettig, A., Kurcharczyk, S., et al. (2015). Evidence-based practices for children, youth, and young adults with autism spectrum disorder: A comprehensive review. Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders. Advance online publication. doi: 10.1007/s10803-014-2351-z